Important notice

pdf COVID-19 Virus Contingency Statement

To our Valued Customers and Partners,

This letter is in response to the outbreak of Coronavirus (COVID-19) and the impact it has taken on demand for multiple protective equipment and medical solutions products, including: Face Masks (N95 and surgical) and Protective Equipment (goggles, gloves, and face shields). This demand currently extends across multiple protective and medical solutions products. We are keeping a watchful eye on additional product lines that could be impacted in the near or distant future.

We are working daily with our supplier partners and logistics providers to address shortages as they occur. Considering the current conditions, we anticipate disruptions to orders for certain infection control products. Moreover, China is retaining significantly more PPE products for use within their country that were originally slated for export. This combination of factors may lead to delays in manufacturing and/or shipments of these select products that Thomas sources from China.

Accordingly, we are proactively placing certain products, within the below categories, on allocation to prioritize our inventory for our existing customers:

  • PPE coveralls, gowns, caps & shoe covers
  • Facial protection
  • Select exam gloves

The evaluation for allocation, as goods are secured, will include multiple factors, most notably historical demand run rates. We are diligently working to find new sources to supplement our current suppliers and enhance our ability to fill orders. As this develops, our team will provide details on how we can potentially improve the current outlook for supply.

Thomas remains committed to balanced distribution of all protective products that both supports the public health and governmental response to the Coronavirus and ensures product availability to our existing industrial and healthcare customers whose operations rely on our products.

To obtain a quotation for price and availability, please submit your requirements to Value@thomassci.com or contact your local Thomas Scientific Sales Representative. Please note that All sales are final, non-cancellable, and non-returnable.

 

 


The proper personal protective equipment is essential in the prevention of transmission of infectious pathogens to laboratory staff

Essential personal protective equipment include Gowns, Facemasks or Respirators, Goggles or Faceshields, and Gloves

The type of PPE used will vary based on the level of precautions required, such as standard and contact, droplet or airborne infection isolation precautions.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is closely monitoring an outbreak of respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus first identified in Wuhan, Hubei Province, China. Chinese authorities identified the new coronavirus, which has resulted in more than a thousand confirmed cases in China, including cases outside Wuhan City. Additional cases have been identified in a growing number of other international locations, including the United States. There are ongoing investigations to learn more.

About Coronavirus:

Coronaviruses are named for the crown-like spikes on their surface. There are four main sub-groupings of coronaviruses, known as alpha, beta, gamma, and delta.

Human coronaviruses were first identified in the mid-1960s. The seven coronaviruses that can infect people are:

Common human coronaviruses

  1. 229E (alpha coronavirus)
  2. NL63 (alpha coronavirus)
  3. OC43 (beta coronavirus)
  4. HKU1 (beta coronavirus)

Other human coronaviruses

  1. MERS-CoV (the beta coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS)
  2. SARS-CoV (the beta coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS)
  3. 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

People around the world commonly get infected with human coronaviruses 229E, NL63, OC43, and HKU1.

Sometimes coronaviruses that infect animals can evolve and make people sick and become a new human coronavirus. Three recent examples of this are SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV, and now 2019-nCoV.

About 2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV)

2019 Novel Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) is a virus (more specifically, a coronavirus) identified as the cause of an outbreak of respiratory illness first detected in Wuhan, China. Early on, many of the patients in the outbreak in Wuhan, China reportedly had some link to a large seafood and animal market, suggesting animal-to-person spread. However, a growing number of patients reportedly have not had exposure to animal markets, indicating person-to-person spread is occurring. At this time, it’s unclear how easily or sustainably this virus is spreading between people.

Where Does it Come From and How Does it Spread?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses that are common in many different species of animals, including camels, cattle, cats, and bats. Rarely, animal coronaviruses can infect people and then spread between people such as with MERS and SARS. Early on, many of the patients in the outbreak of respiratory illness caused by 2019-nCov in Wuhan, China had some link to a large seafood and live animal market, suggesting animal-to-person spread. However, a growing number of patients reportedly have not had exposure to animal markets, indicating person-to-person spread is occurring.

At this time, it’s unclear how easily or sustainably this virus is spreading between people. Chinese officials report that sustained person-to-person spread in the community is occurring in China. Person-to-person spread in the United States has not yet been detected, but it’s likely to occur to some extent. Cases in healthcare settings, like hospitals, may also occur.

When person-to-person spread has occurred with MERS and SARS, it is thought to have happened mainly via respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes, similar to how influenza and other respiratory pathogens spread. Spread of SARS and MERS between people has generally occurred between close contacts.

It’s important to note that how easily a virus spreads person-to-person can vary. Some viruses are highly contagious (like measles), while other viruses are less so. It’s important to know this in order to better understand the risk associated with this virus. While CDC considers this is a very serious public health threat, based on current information, the immediate health risk from 2019-nCoV to the general American public is considered low at this time.

There is much more to learn about the transmissibility, severity, and other features associated with 2019-nCoV and investigations are ongoing.

Symptoms

For confirmed 2019-nCoV infections, reported illnesses have ranged from infected people with little to no symptoms to people being severely ill and dying. Symptoms can include:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

CDC believes at this time that symptoms of 2019-nCoV may appear in as few as 2 days or as long as 14 after exposure. This is based on what has been seen previously as the incubation period of MERS viruses.

Prevention & Treatment

Prevention

There is currently no vaccine to prevent 2019-nCoV infection. The best way to prevent infection is to avoid being exposed to this virus. However, as a reminder, CDC always recommends everyday preventive actions to help prevent the spread of respiratory viruses, including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds. If soap and water are not available, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Stay home when you are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue, then throw the tissue in the trash.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched objects and surfaces.
  • Wear protective clothing, include masks, glovesgowns, and eye protection

These are everyday habits that can help prevent the spread of several viruses. CDC does have specific guidance for travelers.

Treatment

There is no specific antiviral treatment recommended for 2019-nCoV infection. People infected with 2019-nCoV should receive supportive care to help relieve symptoms. For severe cases, treatment should include care to support vital organ functions.

People who think they may have been exposed to 2019-nCoV should contact your healthcare provider immediately.

See Interim Guidance for Healthcare Professionals for information on patients under investigation.

The latest situation summary updates are available on CDC’s web page 2019 Novel Coronavirus, Wuhan, China.

Resources:

CDC Website on Coronavirus

pdf  What you need to know about 2019-nCoV

pdf  What to do if you are sick with 2019-nCoV

pdf  Novel Coronavirus Information for Travelers

About Ebola:

Ebola, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a rare and deadly disease caused by infection with one of the Ebola virus strains. Ebola can cause disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees).

Ebola is caused by infection with a virus of the family Filoviridae, genus Ebolavirus. There are five identified Ebola virus species, four of which are known to cause disease in humans: Ebola virus (Zaire ebolavirus); Sudan virus (Sudan ebolavirus); Taï Forest virus (Taï Forest ebolavirus, formerly Côte d’Ivoire ebolavirus); and Bundibugyo virus (Bundibugyo ebolavirus). The fifth, Reston virus (Reston ebolavirus), has caused disease in nonhuman primates, but not in humans.

Ebola viruses are found in several African countries. Ebola was first discovered in 1976 near the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Since then, outbreaks have appeared sporadically in Africa.

The natural reservoir host of Ebola virus remains unknown. However, on the basis of evidence and the nature of similar viruses, researchers believe that the virus is animal-borne and that bats are the most likely reservoir. Four of the five virus strains occur in an animal host native to Africa.

Laboratory and Healthcare workers who may be exposed to people with Ebola should follow these steps:

  • Wear protective clothing, including masks, gloves, gowns, and eye protection
  • Practice proper infection control and sterilization measures. For more information, see “Infection Control for Viral Hemorrhagic Fevers in the African Health Care Setting”.
  • Isolate patients with Ebola from other patients.
  • Avoid direct contact with the bodies of people who have died from Ebola.
  • Notify health officials if you have had direct contact with the blood or body fluids, such as but not limited to, feces, saliva, urine, vomit, and semen of a person who is sick with Ebola. The virus can enter the body through broken skin or unprotected mucous membranes in, for example, the eyes, nose, or mouth

Resources:

CDC Website on Ebola

pdf  Interim Guidance for Specimen Collection, Transport, Testing, and Submission for Patients with Suspected Infection with Ebola Virus Disease

pdf  Sequence for Putting on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)

pdf  Donning and Removing Personal Protective Equipment Practicum

pdf  Guidance for the Selection and Use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in Healthcare Settings

pdf  Facts-about-ebola

pdf  Infographic - Facts about Ebola in the US

pdf  DuPont Personal Protection - Ebola_Tech_Bulletin_ 91114b

Ebola: What Airline Crew and Staff Need to Know

 

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